Living on the edge 5 European Cliff Cities

 

1. RONDA (Spain)

SECTION CANYON DEPTH OF 100 M

Ronda Spain
Ronda Spain

Rondo town, in the Spanish province of Malaga, located in mountainous terrain at an altitude of about 750 m above sea level and about 100 km. (6o mi.)  from the city of Malaga and with a population of approximately 35,000 inhabitants. Canyon called El Tajo depth of loo m separates the old part of town from the new. Some houses are right on the edge of a precipice. Moving from one part of the city to another is possible through the tree bridges built in different hi­storical periods Puente Romano or “Roman Bridge”, Puente Viejo (“Old Bridge”, also known as the Puente Árabe or “Arab Bridge”), and Puente Nuevo (“New Bridge”), span the canyon. Building of Puente Nuevo bridge commenced in 1751 and took until 1793 to complete. The Puente Nuevo is the tallest of the bridges, towering 120 m (390 ft) above the canyon floor, and all three serve as some of the city’s most impressive features. The former town hall, which stands next to the Puente Nuevo has a view of the Tajo canyon.

2. BONIFACIO (Corsica)

70 METERS ABOVE THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA

Bonifacio Corsica France
Bonifacio Corsica France

High up a white limestone cliff on the southern coast of Corsica lies the medieval town of Bonifacio and it is located on the southern side of the island of Cor­sica. This fragile-looking citadel stands at a height of 70 m on limestone cliffs, Bonifacio is known and recognized by its medieval heritage exceptional perched on a limestone cliff by the sea looking at the horizon in a delightful setting. This bastion of the sea invites contemplation, the fascination, the spell. Over the centuries, Bonifa­cio was a harbor for many ships now its haven for luxury yachts that come here from all over the world.

3. KASTELLFOLIT DE LA ROCA (Spain)

LOCATED ON THE 50-METER HIGH BASALT ROCK

Castellfollit de la Roca Spain
Castellfollit de la Roca Spain

Catalan city Kastellfolit-de-la-Roca is situated on a basalt crag, which is around 1 km in length and 50 meters high. Originally, thousands upon thousands of years ago, lava flowed from volcanic eruptions, and then the erosive action of the two rivers formed the crag where the village lies today. The houses in the old part of the village are predominately made from volcanic rocks. The medieval centre has narrow, shadowy streets, which seem to take their personality from the mystical appearance of some of the natural surroundings.

The picturesque village, and the unique landscape that surrounds it, should really be seen if you are within reach.

4. SANTORINI (Greece)

A PARADISE AT A HEIGHT OF 300 M

Santorini Greece
Santorini Greece

The archipelago of Santorini, which lies almost 200 km south-east of mainland Greece, is a consequence of powerful volcanic explosion which de­stroyed the earliest settlements in this once-a holistic island. A giant central lagoon of the caldera has a size of about 12 for 7 miles and is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs. Santorini is the most popular island in Greece. It may be the most popular island in the world. There are few travel destinations that combine beautiful beaches, spectacular scenery, ancient cities, amazing restaurants, some of the world’s best wine, and an active volcano.

5. MANAROLA (Italy)

ITALIAN CITY WITH THE MOST RISKY LOCATION.

Manarola Italy
Manarola Italy

Manarola, in the Italian province of Liguria, is the most risky position among all Italian cities. Hard to tell exactly how old is this settlement, but Roman texts there are mentions of a wonderful wine that is produced. Manarola, built on a high rock 70 metres above sea level, is one of the most charming and romantic of the five towns “Cinque Terre – in Italian“ (Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola and Riomaggiore ).The tiny harbor features a boat ramp, picturesque multicolored houses facing the sea, a tiny piazza with seafood restaurants. And today we can enjoy a stroll near the famous vineyards, to walk the alley of love (Via dell’Amore) and admire the bri­ght-colored houses that hang over the sea waves. The Cinque Terre, recognized in 1997 by the Unesco Mankind’s World Heritage, is today a National Park and Protected Marine Area with the aim of protecting this great cultural heritage and natural environment.

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